Menu

Fat Deficiency Kills More People

Fat Deficiency Kills More People Every Year Than Breast Cancer

Omega-3 deficiency is the sixth biggest killer of Americans, according to a new study.

Harvard University researchers looked at 12 dietary, lifestyle and metabolic risk factors such as tobacco smoking and high blood pressure, and used a mathematical model to determine how many fatalities could have been prevented if better practices had been observed.

The study determined that there were 72,000-96,000 preventable deaths each year due to omega-3 deficiency, highlighting the importance of establishing a dietary reference intake (DRI) for omega-3 forms such as EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid).

Another study found that a combination of omega-3 fatty acids and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) decreased blood pressure and heart rate in kidney disease patients.

People with chronic kidney disease (CKD), which increases the risk of heart disease, experienced improvements in both blood pressure and heart rate following supplementation with four grams of omega-3 fats.

Furthermore, when the omega 3’s were taken in combination with coenzyme Q10, the blood pressure reducing benefits were enhanced. CKD is linked to increased prevalence in all-cause mortality, cardiovascular events and hospitalization.

In addition to benefiting your physical health, omega-3 fats can also be good for you mind.

Researchers have shown that depressed patients have, on average, lower levels of omega-3 in their blood than nondepressed individuals. A greater severity of depression is also linked to lower levels of omega-3. A number of well-controlled depression treatment studies have found therapeutic benefits following omega-3 supplementation.

Sources:
U.S. News & World Report September 18, 2009
Nutralngredients September 17, 2009
Nutralngredients June 26, 2009

Our Location

19 Center St. | Chatham, NJ 07928

Office Hours

Our General Schedule

Monday:

Closed

Tuesday:

9:00am - 7:00pm

Wednesday:

2:00pm - 7:00pm

Thursday:

9:00am - 7:00pm

Friday:

10:00am - 2:00pm

Saturday:

8:00am - 1:00pm

Sunday:

Closed